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Top working an old Conference pear tree – end February 2021

It seemed a good time to use a non productive Conference pear tree to keep some old Turkish pear varieties growing. I had 3 varieties of Turkish pears, Sheikh Serfettin, Ankara and Tacettin Usta to graft. The below are a … Continue reading

Snow in the Orchard January 2021

Winter Snow in the Orchard February 2021 Continue reading

A really dirty looking apple with large Water Core

In gathering any apples left hanging, that might be useful for cooking. We found 2 apples that were very dirty looking, but very heavy. We assumed they were going to be hard and good for cooking. They were added to … Continue reading

A little advice re Solar Panels connected to Trail Cameras

Here we have one small detail that I overlooked in installing a Solar Panel to my battery charger setup, plugged into my trail cameras. This information may be quite minor, but it is not detailed anywhere. Maybe people already know … Continue reading

Requested photos of Newly Formed Roots and Callusing of Rootstock

Many people have asked how do the roots form on rootstock. The basic’s are the same for any hardwood cuttings and there propagation. Here we have a bundle callused rootstocks, just come out of the heated beds. Most are callused, … Continue reading

Apple – William Crump – Nov 2020

William Crump is a relatively large apple by modern standards. It was named after the head gardener at Madresfield Court in Worcesterhire in 1908. It is a cross between Cox’s Orange Pippin and Worcester Pearmain, hence its bright red skin … Continue reading

Hens Turd Apple Variety – Nov 2020

I have a problem, this variety was given to me as scion wood. It is supposed to be a Hens Turd apple. I have no confirmed photo id of this variety, so I cannot verify it being correct. If anybody … Continue reading

Buzzards eating post in an old tree – Nov 2020

We have a gappy hedge that was overgrown, with branches bending over laying over the ground. The hedge is primarily blackthorn, with the odd hawthorn and and old (almost dead) oak tree. I can understand about the oak giving up, … Continue reading

Dawlish Countryside Park Orchard – October 2020

Somewhere different and never been too before, and it has 2 orchards. This is Dawlish Countryside Park in Devon, UK. Continue reading

A big apple ‘Lanes Prince Albert’ 30th Oct 2020

variety that does not need any sugar adding when used in cooking. The sizes of our fruit can be over 15cm diameter and a weight over 500 grams Continue reading

Fruit Trees

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We supply Fruit Trees of most types from Apple to Apricots. We do not knowingly sell patented scions or trees, if we have inadvertently offered for sale any varieties, please get in touch with us urgently.

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  • Apple

    Apple

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    Apple (Malus)

    We offer a wide range of apple trees be it eating, cooking or cider apple tree varieties. All are grown in our fruit tree nursery.

    Apple trees are one of the few trees that have been grown throughout the world. With many varieties developed to grow in certain temperature locations. We grow a broad range of the old traditional varieties as well as some of the modern ones.

    We grow varieties on behalf of the LEICESTERSHIRE HERITAGE APPLE PROJECT - Potted , with most of the proceeds going towards the support of that project. Please be aware that these trees "are supplied as growing stock only and must not be used for commercial grafting".



  • Apricot

    Apricot

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    Apricot (Prunus armeniaca)

    Virtually all of our Apricots are grown on St Julian A rootstocks. There are starting to be a lot of Apricot crosses, that are now getting popular.

    Apricots are normally grown in hot countries, especially the Mediterranean areas. The varieties that we offer tend to be late flowering, to try to miss the frosts and also early fruiting. To get the best they need to grown against a south facing wall.






  • Asian Pear

    Asian Pear

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    Asian Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia)

    Asian pears are surprisingly easy to grow, no more difficult to grow than a European pear.

    They produce mouth watering fruits of a very delicate flavour and are very crunchy.








  • Blackberry

    Blackberry

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    Blackberry (Rubus)

    Blackberries grow more or less wild throughout the whole of the UK. They grow in virtually any soil, but prefer loam/clay.

    The cultivated varieties produce regular crops at specific times of the year, ideal for processing. But many of the more wild varieties crop over a longer period, with a taste that usually more exquisite, and a real blackberry flavour.






  • Blue Sausage

    Blue Sausage

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    Blue Sausage (Decaisnea fargesii)

    A deciduous shrub growing to 4 m (13ft) by 4 m (13ft) at a medium rate.
    It is hardy to zone 5 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf in mid April, and flowers in June, with the seeds ripening from Sept to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and thus the plant is self-fertile.

    A very cold-hardy plant when fully dormant, but the flowers and young growth in spring can be damaged by late frosts

    The fruit when eaten raw has a sweet taste, with a very nice delicate flavour. The fruit looks like a bright blue sausage or broad bean pod and is up to 10cm long. You peel off the skin in much the same way as you would peel a broad bean pod, this reveals a line of seed running the entire length of the fruit surrounded by a layer of edible flesh.


  • Cherry

    Cherry

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    Cherry (Prunus)

    Yes you can grow some of the tastiest cherries here in the UK, but you have to be quick if you want to beat the birds. You really need to net the trees, or grow a white/yellow variety.

    Dwarfing rootstocks now make cherry picking a lot easier.

    With many varieties developed to grow in certain temperature locations. We grow a broad range of the old traditional varieties as well as some of the modern ones. Also with the dessert varieties we do offer the tart cooking cherries.



  • Damson

    Damson

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    Damson (Prunus insititia)

    A deciduous tree that grows at a medium rate. It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower in April, and the fruits ripen in Sept / October.

    They are regarded as being self fertile. The fruits tend to be more acidic than a plum but it is very acceptable raw when fully ripe, especially after being touched by frost. Very often used to make jams and preserves. Shropshire Prune is believed to one of the original varieties bought back by the Crusaders from Damascus, in Syria.





  • Elderberry

    Elderberry

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    Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)

    Its fruit is ripe from Aug to September.

    A very easily grown plant, it grows well in heavy clay soils.

    When cooked it makes delicious jams, preserves, pies, sauces, chutneys etc, it is also often used to make wine. The fruit is about 8mm in diameter and is borne in large clusters.

    The flowers have an aromatic smell and flavour and are used to add a muscatel flavour to stewed fruits, jellies and jams (especially gooseberry jam). They are often used to make a sparkling wine. A sweet tea is made from the dried flowers.

  • Fig

    Fig

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    There are about 850 varieties worldwide Some are dessert/hot climate varieties and some can produce 2 crops in one. Some are good for eating as they can be very sweet, and some are good for drying and canning. Some can also withstand very cold winter temperatures down to -15 deg C the tops may die off but they reshoot from the base.

    For production its is normal to confine there roots, to make the tree grow less tall and also maximize production

    There are two fruiting types, those that only have 1 crop per year sometimes known as UNIFERES, and those that can produce 2 crops sometimes known as BIFERES. Obviously in the UK outdoor climates single crops are best, but if given protection 2 crop types can be grown. The first crop is known as the 'first or breva' crop, whilst the second crop is known as the 'main' crop.



  • Grape

    Grape


    Grapes (Vitis vinifera)

    Grapes are easy to grow, as long the variety is compatible with the local environment. Be it indoors are outdoors, red, white or black, seed or seedless.

    The art to successful grape growing is as again with all other fruit, variety, temperature, nutrients, water, air flow and pruning regime.

    You have to be ruthless in thinning out the grape bunches. I know it seems harsh, all of those small bunches of grapes growing well. But in the long term its for the better.

    All of our varieties are grown outside, on a cordon system, protection must be given against the birds.

  • Green Gage

    Green Gage


    Green Gage (Prunus domestica)

    Is an edible drupaceous fruit, a cultivar of the plum. It was developed in Moissac, France from a green-fruited wild plum (Ganerik) originally found in Asia Minor. It is identified by its small, oval shape, smooth-textured flesh, and ranging in colour from green to yellow, grown in temperate areas.

    They are known for their rich, confectionery flavour that causes them to be considered one of the finest dessert plums.





  • Hawthorn

    Hawthorn


    Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna)

    A deciduous Shrub growing to 6 m (19ft) by 6 m (19ft) at a medium rate.
    It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower from May to June, and the fruits ripen from Sept to November. The flowers are pollinated by Midges. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

    A very easily grown plant, it prefers a well-drained moisture retentive loamy soil but is not at all fussy.

    The fruit is not very appetizing raw, it is normally used for making jams and preserves. The fruit can be dried, ground, mixed with flour and used for making bread etc. The fruit is about 1cm in diameter (dependant on cultivar). Young shoots when eaten raw have a pleasant nutty flavour, they are a good addition to the salad bowl.

  • Kiwi

    Kiwi

  • Medlar

    Medlar


    Medlar (Mespilus germanica)

    It is hardy to zone 6, and it flowers from May to June, and the fruits ripen in November. The flowers are pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile.

    Succeeds in most soils, preferring one that is moist and well-drained. Prefers a sunny position and a fertile soil. Occasionally cultivated for its edible fruit, there are some named varieties.

    The fruit can be harvested in late autumn after it has been bletted, before it can be eaten raw. At this stage the flesh turns from white to brown, becomes very soft and is quite sweet that somewhat resembles a date. The fruit of the wild species is up to 25mm in diameter, though some cultivars can be 65mm in diameter.

  • Mulberry

    Mulberry


    Mulberry (Morus)

    There are 3 main species of Mulberry in cultivation in the UK, Morus Alba (White Mulberry), Morus Nigra (Black Mulberry) and Morus Rubra (Red Mulberry).

    It is in flower in May, and the fruits ripen from July to August. The plant is self-fertile. Hardy to zone 5, but some Nigra cultivars are only hardy to zone 8.

    The soft fruits can be variable to the taste, and there size can vary from quite small to over 7cm long. The fruit can be eaten raw, cooked or made into preserves.



  • Nectarine

    Nectarine


    Nectarine (Prunus persica)

    A deciduous tree that is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower in April, and the fruit ripens from July to August. The flowers are pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile.

    The fruit can be eaten raw, cooked or dried for later use. The fruit is often used in ice creams, pies, jams etc. When fully ripe, the fruits of the best forms are soft and juicy with a rich delicious flavour. The size of fruit varies between cultivars but can be up to 7cm in diameter.





  • Pawpaw

    Pawpaw


    Pawpaw (Asimina Triloba)

    A deciduous shrub growing to 4.5 m (14ft) by 4 m (13ft) at a slow rate.
    It is hardy to zone 5 and untroubled by pests or diseases. It is in flower from May to June, and the seeds ripen in October. The flowers are self-fertile.

    The edible fruit can be eaten raw or cooked. Some varieties can be up to 16cm long and 4cm wide. Of variable quality, some forms (with orange skins) are exquisite with the flavour of banana custard.

    Prefers a rich loamy soil with plenty of moisture and a sunny position. Young plants should be given some protection for their first year or two.

  • Peach

    Peach


    Peach (Prunus persica)

    A deciduous Tree growing that is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower in April, and the fruit ripen from Jul to August. The flowers are self-fertile.

    The fruit be it raw, cooked or dried is often used in ice creams, pies, jams etc. When fully ripe, the fruit of the best forms are very juicy with a rich delicious flavour. The size of fruit varies widely between cultivars and the wild form, it can be up to 7cm in diameter.

    They requires a well-drained moisture retentive soil. Requires shelter from north and north-east winds and also from spring frosts. They require some protection if cropping is to be reliable.

  • Pear

    Pear


    Pear (Pyrus communis)

    It is hardy to zone 4, and it is in flower from Apr to May. The flowers are pollinated by Insects. The plant is not self-fertile.

    The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked. The flavour ranges from rather harsh and astringent (cultivars used for making alcoholic drinks ie Perry) through to soft, sweet and very juicy. The best dessert fruits have an exquisite sweet flavour, usually with a very soft flesh, whilst cooking varieties have harder less sweet flesh.

    Prefers a good well-drained loam in full sun. Grows well in heavy clay soils. There are many named varieties that can provide fruit from late July to April or May of the following year.


  • Persimmon

    Persimmon


    Persimmon (Diospyros)

    There are 3 main species grown for fruit, Diospyros kaki - Persimmon, Diospyros lotus - Date Plum and Diospyros virginiana - American Persimmon

    In general the fruit can be eaten raw or cooked. When fully ripe the fruit has an exquisitely rich flavour something like apricot and mango, with 25% sugars. The fruit can range from 1.5cm diameter to about 7.5cm in diameter.

    Prefers a good deep loamy soil in sun or light shade but succeeds in most soils. Dislikes very acid or wet and poorly drained soils. Requires a sheltered position. Dormant plants are quite hardy in Britain. A warm sunny location improves the chance of producing ripe fruit. Fruits are frequently produced outdoors at Kew. The young trees require some winter protection for their first winter or two.

  • Plum

    Plum


    Plum (Prunus domestica)

    It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower in April, and the fruits ripen from Jul to November. The flowers are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.

    The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked, but varies considerably from cultivar to cultivar, with many soft and juicy with a delicious flavour ranging from very sweet to acid. The more acid fruits are usually only used for cooking purposes.

    Requires a well-drained moisture retentive soil and a sheltered position.



  • Quince

    Quince


    Quince (Cydonia Oblonga)

    It is hardy to zone 4. It flowers in May, and the fruits ripen in November. The flowers are pollinated by Insects.

    When grown in warm climates the fruit can become soft and juicy and is suitable for eating raw. In cooler climates such as Britain, however, it remains hard and astringent and needs to be cooked before being eaten. It is used in jellies, preserves etc. The cooked fruit adds a delicious flavour to cooked apples. The fruit is rich in pectin.

    Succeeds in most soils but prefers a light moist fertile soil and a sunny position. Dislikes very dry or waterlogged soils. The quince has been cultivated for over two thousand years for its edible fruit and its seed, though it is not a widely grown crop.



  • Rasin Tree

    Rasin Tree


    Japanese Raisin Tree (Hovenia dulcis)

    is a hardy tree (zone 5) that occursall over Asia, growing preferably in a sunny position on moist sandy or loamy soils.

    The drupes appear at the ends of edible fleshy fruit stalks, which is a type of accessory fruit.

    Its not the fruit you eat but the fleshy thickened fruit stalks, when dried, have the sweet flavour and texture of raisins and can be used in the same way. They have a pear-like flavour when ripe, which is when they fall to the ground. They may be small in size but are usually in large quantities. The other beauty of these fruits is that you don't need to dry them.



  • Sea Buckthorn

    Sea Buckthorn


    Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides)

    Can be a prickly deciduous shrub or small tree, it can sometimes be evasive and can sucker. It is noted for its plentiful edible (somewhat sour) orange berries which are very high in vitamins and antioxidants, commonly found in coastal positions but which also does very well inland, even in very cold positions.

    For a good supply of berries, it needs to be in a sunny situation, with a separate male and female plant. But the sex is not distinguishable until flowering - male flowers are conical and conspicuous, female are rounder and smaller.

    Its very useful in wet sites (it does not like dry soil) and can fix nitrogen in the soil so its helpful in improving poor soils.



  • Sloe

    Sloe


    Sloe - Blackthorn (Prunus Spinosa)

    Sloes are the fruit of the Blackthorn. It is very astringent, but is used for flavouring of the drink, known as sloe gin or sloe vodka. Although not actually fermented but it is an infusion.

    The fruit is normally ready for drinking, just in time for Christmas and the New Year.

    It is traditional in Northern Europe and Britain in making a hedge that is resistant against cattle.

    The fruit is similar to a small damson of approx 12mm dia, and is normally picked after the first frost.



  • Sorbus

    Sorbus


    Sorbus

    This species of tree, covers Whitebeam, Mountain Ash, Service Tree.

    Generally they are hardy to zone 7 . With them in flower from May to June, and the fruits/seeds ripen from Sept to October. The flowers and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.
    It is noted for attracting wildlife.

    The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked. The fruit is usually bletted if it is going to be eaten raw. The fruit is up to 15mm across and is produced in bunches which makes harvesting easier.

    Succeeds in most reasonably good soils in an open sunny position. Tolerates light shade, though it fruits better in a sunny position. At one time the fruits of this species were collected and sold in local markets in S.W. England.



  • Strawberry Tree

    Strawberry Tree


    Strawberry Tree (Arbutus unedo)

    An evergreen tree hardy to zone 7. It flowers in autumn, and have a mild sweet scent. and are pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile.

    The fruit ripens at the same time as the next flowering.

    The fruit contains about 20% sugars and can be used to make delicious and nourishing jams and preserves. It is ripe in November/December and is about 15mm in diameter.

    As the fruits drop to the ground when ripe they are eagerly sought after by wildlife.



  • Viburnum

    Viburnum

    Viburnum

    This species covers Geulder Rose (Viburnum opulus) and Wayfaring Tree (Viburnum lantana) both growing 5m tall x 4 m spread.

    It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower from May to June, and the fruits ripen from Jul to September. The flowers pollinated by Insects. The plant is self-fertile

    The fruit is definitely a famine food, it is only used when all else fails. But is eagerly taken by wildlife.

    A very easily grown plant and adapts to most soils.



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